Category Archives: tips

how to stop windows 10 from rearranging your desktop icons

I’m a desktop minimalist myself and the trashcan is about all I want to see on my desktop. However if you like your desktop with lots of icons on it, arranged according to some non-alphabetical grouping system you might find out that Windows sometimes rearranges them nicely in alphabetical order, aligning them all nicely to the top left of your desktop without your prior consent.
This typically happens after reboots, switching between resolutions, plugging and unplugging a secondary screen or docking/un-docking the laptop.
It can drive people mad.

This seems to be an issue that has been plaguing Windows 8 and 10 for quite a while already, driving lot’s of people bonkers. Unfortunately when looking for a solution online in various fora you tend to find a lot of useless tips or the suggestion to install some third-party desktop icon position-saving software. Eew.

There is a simple solution in the Windows settings however, but I have to admit it’s not very obvious and I had to look for it quite a bit to find it.

It’s all in the settings as expected, but it’s spread out in two different spots, which makes it hard to get right.

Here’s how to fix it:

1. Right click on your desktop and disable the auto arrange feature by disabling the checkbox next in View > Auto arrange icons.

Shows how to disable the auto arrange icons feature in Windows.

You’d think that should do the trick right? Well most people do. But there’s another option that interferes with your desktop icon zen garden staying the way you want it.

2. Right click again on your desktop, now click Personalize.
You’ll see the Settings screen appear.
There you select Themes.
Now click Desktop icon settings.
Now look what we have there. A checkbox labeled “Allow themes to change desktop icons“.

Uncheck it and press OK.

You should now no longer experience the frustration of computer code messing with your desktop icons.

Zen at last.

Disable the Allow themes to change desktop icons checkbox

 

erase free space on an SSD drive

DeleteAs you probably know (because you’re reading this post) Windows doesn’t really destroy a file when it is deleted. It merely removes the references in the file table so you don’t see it in on the file system anymore. But the file is still intact sitting there on your hard drive until some other file is written over it.
If you want to truly erase those files on a HDD drive you can use a number of tools to erase the free space on the drive. What these tools do is simply overwrite all free space with random data and thus effectively overwriting and destroying those deleted files still sitting intact in your free disk space.
Free tools that can do this are the command line Secure Delete tool from System Internals and the handy CCleaner (see the tools menu).

For an SSD drive however overwriting the free space with random data is bad for your drive. SSD’s have a limited number of times you can write data to their blocks. Using a random data overwrite tool, which can even end up do this multiple times, is just a bad idea.

Luckily everything is built into your SSD drive to do this automatically. It’s called the TRIM function and from Windows 7 on this is activated by default so normally you don’t have to do a thing to take advantage of this secure-delete feature.

However if you are like me then you want to be sure if this feature is activated.
On Windows, you can do this by opening a command prompt and entering the following command:

fsutil behavior query disabledeletenotify

If you get the following, your TRIM command is already active on Windows:

NTFS DisableDeleteNotify = 0

If this would return a value of 1, you can activate the TRIM function with this command:

fsutil behavior set DisableDeleteNotify 0

You can find more detailed instructions and information about activating the TRIM function here:
How to check if TRIM is enabled on your SSD and how to enable it
Why SSD TRIM support is so important and how to enable it

And then there’s always Google of course.

Photo by Delete, cc-licensed.

disable flash and silverlight for safer surfing

Flash, Silverlight and (*gasp*) QuickTime plugins in your browser with the modern web are about as necessary as a horse whip is on a Tesla. Well I might be exaggerating a bit. There are still some useful sites out there that actually use these things. Intranet sites that run on IE only for example, or flaky game sites. But any self-respecting web developer has long ditched them in favor of fancy new HTML5 features.

So why would you still run these things in your favorite browser (Firefox right?) where they only take up extra memory and have a bunch of security problems that might end up causing you trouble. There have been enough exploits for the Flash plugin out there to be sure to actually update those plugins every time they ask for it. Which is about every week if I recall correctly.

Anyway, it’s better to turns those damn things off completely and only turn them on when you hit one of those web sites maintained by a dinosaur. That way you’re stopping that evil hacker from taking over your machine with his Flash exploit and you’re gaining some free performance along the way.

In Firefox you can turn those plugins off in your Tools menu, under Add-ons. Just select “Never activate” and you’ll be fine.
Switch it back to “Ask to Activate” if you’d need them again. That way they’ll never activate by accident either, if you forget to turn it back off.
On Chrome it’s a bit more elaborate, but the option “Let me choose when to run plugin content” sounds like a safe bet instead of having plugin code be ran willy-nilly.
IE? Ha! Who cares right?! For anything else, a properly aimed search query should find you the answer in no time.

Oh, and don’t forget to tweak your Flash security settings if you decide to keep it on after all.

The Firefox add-in screen with all plugins disabled. Just like it should be.