Category Archives: geek

automatically delete emails with IMAP Cleanup

Let’s say you have this IOT device like a motion detection camera. Which sends you emails. Emails you keep in a separate IMAP mailbox. Lots of emails. So you want to delete those emails in some automated fashion, because doing that daily is oh so boring (remember, lots of emails).

Wouldn’t it be great if there was like some handy command line tool that would delete the oldest emails and keep like a 1.000 or 500 of them only? Well yes, that way I could script that annoying job and run it daily.

I didn’t find something that already did this. So I figured I’d be able to whip something up in an hour or so using PowerShell, or maybe a small .NET console application using an existing IMAP library.

Well, 3 different IMAP libraries and about 4 hours later I did have something rudimentary that finally did what it was supposed to do. Delete the oldest email, and leave the most recent 1000 (or whatever number you want) behind. That took longer than expected, so to regain as much time spent on this as possible I threw the ImapCleanup tool on GitHub, including binary downloads. I hope someone else will find this useful as well.

Beware though. This tool deletes emails. Be careful which mailbox you point this at, and make sure you test it in advance on a dummy mailbox. Maybe your email server behaves differently than mine, and important emails get digitally shredded by mistake.

publish a static website to Azure using GitHub actions

Last post I talked about setting up a serverless website on Azure using BLOB storage. What I didn’t go into is how to publish files to that site automatically. Yes, you can use the BLOB explorer to manually upload your files but seriously, who wants to do that kind of boring task if you can let computers do that for you.

Instead, what I do to publish this excellent programming guidelines website is the following:

  • I make my changes locally and test it.
  • I commit & push my changes to the master branch of my git repository.
  • A GitHub action kicks in and published the site to the Azure BLOB container.

How sweet is that? Pretty sweet, I know. How do you set this up? Well let me take you through the steps my friend, and automated Git deployment will soon be yours to enjoy as well.

  • You need to create a Git repository on GitHub.
    Now that you can create unlimited private repositories, you don’t even have to expose it to the public, which is nice.
  • Clone the repo locally, and create a source/ directory in it. This is where the source code will go, and that’s what we’ll push to the Azure BLOB container. Any other files you don’t want published go in the root, or in other folders in the root of your repository.
  • Copy your source code into the source/ folder, or create a simple index.html file for testing the publishing action.
  • Go to your repository page on the GitHub site, and click the Actions tab at the top.
  • Click New Workflow, choose “set up a workflow yourself”.
  • It will now create a YAML file for you containing your workflow code.
  • Paste the content for your YAML file listed below. Notice the “source” folder in there? That indicates what folder will be copied to Azure.
    In case you run into trouble, you can dig in to the Azure Storage Action setup yourself, but it should do the trick.
on: [push]
jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps: 
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1
    - uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
      with:
        dotnet-version: '3.0.100'
    - uses: lauchacarro/Azure-Storage-Action@v1.0
      with:
        enabled-static-website: 'true'
        folder: 'source'
        index-document: 'index.html'
        error-document: '404.html' 
        connection-string: ${{ secrets.CONNECTION_STRING }}
  • Last step is to set up that CONNECTION_STRING secret. This is the connection string to your Azure storage container. You can set the secret from your GitHub repository Settings tab, under Secrets.
    Click New Secret, then use the name CONNECTION_STRING and paste the access key value from your Azure storage account.

You’re all set up!
To test your publishing flow, all you need to do now is push a commit to your master branch, and see the GitHub action kick in and do its thing.
You should see your site appear in a few seconds. Sweet!

Update: recently I found out the workflow broke because of a bug in the latest version of the action. To bypass this I now fixed the version in my workflow YAML file to v1.0, which still works. It’s probably a good idea to avoid this kind of breaking changes by fixing the version of any action you use in your GitHub actions anyway. It will avoid those annoying issues where things work one day, and don’t the next.

programming guidelines, sort of

Years ago I ran into a website offering crude design advice. I thought it would be funny to make something similar for programming advice or guidelines. I started with a one-page website with a bunch of tips and then after a while forgot about it. Recently I ran into that project again and figured I might as well put it out here for the heck of it.

So here it is, some good fucking programming guidelines for you developers out there to have a laugh with, or perhaps even find a few useful tips and links in there. I swear, most of those tips are actually valid, even though they are presented in a tongue in cheek way.

So have fun with it. I know I did when I built the damn thing.

Conway’s game of life

Recently the mathematician John Horton Conway passed away, who invented the well known Game Of Life. An algorithmic game I ended up building a version of in HTML at some point for fun. After seeing the news I remembered I still had this sitting around on my hard drive somewhere. So in memoriam, here it is to play around with.

It’s in an iframe, but if it doesn’t render properly you can use the direct link as well.
Thanks for the games John. RIP.