Author Archives: n3wjack

chilling in covid times

Times are tough and stressful for everyone right now. So perhaps a bit of ambient and chill tunes can help to relax a little in this taxing times.

I blogged about Moby’s Long Ambient release a while ago, and I recently found out he also released a second installment of great, long ambient tunes to chill to for free. I love to put these on when I try to get some sleep on a flight. But I guess I won’t be doing that anytime soon.

Check out LA1 & LA2 here.

Also check out my other ambient posts if you want some more music to chill too. Plenty of good free stuff in there to soothe those nerves.

automatically delete emails with IMAP Cleanup

Let’s say you have this IOT device like a motion detection camera. Which sends you emails. Emails you keep in a separate IMAP mailbox. Lots of emails. So you want to delete those emails in some automated fashion, because doing that daily is oh so boring (remember, lots of emails).

Wouldn’t it be great if there was like some handy command line tool that would delete the oldest emails and keep like a 1.000 or 500 of them only? Well yes, that way I could script that annoying job and run it daily.

I didn’t find something that already did this. So I figured I’d be able to whip something up in an hour or so using PowerShell, or maybe a small .NET console application using an existing IMAP library.

Well, 3 different IMAP libraries and about 4 hours later I did have something rudimentary that finally did what it was supposed to do. Delete the oldest email, and leave the most recent 1000 (or whatever number you want) behind. That took longer than expected, so to regain as much time spent on this as possible I threw the ImapCleanup tool on GitHub, including binary downloads. I hope someone else will find this useful as well.

Beware though. This tool deletes emails. Be careful which mailbox you point this at, and make sure you test it in advance on a dummy mailbox. Maybe your email server behaves differently than mine, and important emails get digitally shredded by mistake.

battle beats vol two breakcore compilation

A while ago I saw this Facebook post in a breakcore group pass by with a call for submissions for a compilation album on some net-label. So I checked some of my unfinished tunes and found something suitable to finish and submit.

So here it is. The album turned out to be a “glorious mess” of very different types of breakcore tunes. Check it out if you want to be surprised and feel like listening to a something different. I bet you’ll find something cool you like in there. If not, no big loss. You can listen to the full album here and on Bandcamp, and download for free if you want.

soothing pastel wallpapers of japan

How about some nice oriental eye candy? Here are some beautiful pastel Japanese sights from artist Elora Pautrat.
I’m only showing a few of those below. If you want more of those, and in higher resolutions, you’ll have to head over to her Owakita_ Twitter account and get them from the media list. You can also get them from her website, but you’ll have to dig a little deeper there as the images can’t be directly downloaded.
In Firefox, you can get them by right-clicking and choosing View Page Info > Media, or by saving the full page to your hard drive. This last trick also works with Chrome.

Note that these are for personal use only. You’re free to use them as desktop or phone wallpapers, or use them as your Twitter banner. But no commercial use of any kind please.

publish a static website to Azure using GitHub actions

Last post I talked about setting up a serverless website on Azure using BLOB storage. What I didn’t go into is how to publish files to that site automatically. Yes, you can use the BLOB explorer to manually upload your files but seriously, who wants to do that kind of boring task if you can let computers do that for you.

Instead, what I do to publish this excellent programming guidelines website is the following:

  • I make my changes locally and test it.
  • I commit & push my changes to the master branch of my git repository.
  • A GitHub action kicks in and published the site to the Azure BLOB container.

How sweet is that? Pretty sweet, I know. How do you set this up? Well let me take you through the steps my friend, and automated Git deployment will soon be yours to enjoy as well.

  • You need to create a Git repository on GitHub.
    Now that you can create unlimited private repositories, you don’t even have to expose it to the public, which is nice.
  • Clone the repo locally, and create a source/ directory in it. This is where the source code will go, and that’s what we’ll push to the Azure BLOB container. Any other files you don’t want published go in the root, or in other folders in the root of your repository.
  • Copy your source code into the source/ folder, or create a simple index.html file for testing the publishing action.
  • Go to your repository page on the GitHub site, and click the Actions tab at the top.
  • Click New Workflow, choose “set up a workflow yourself”.
  • It will now create a YAML file for you containing your workflow code.
  • Paste the content for your YAML file listed below. Notice the “source” folder in there? That indicates what folder will be copied to Azure.
    In case you run into trouble, you can dig in to the Azure Storage Action setup yourself, but it should do the trick.
on: [push]
jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps: 
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1
    - uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
      with:
        dotnet-version: '3.0.100'
    - uses: lauchacarro/Azure-Storage-Action@v1.0
      with:
        enabled-static-website: 'true'
        folder: 'source'
        index-document: 'index.html'
        error-document: '404.html' 
        connection-string: ${{ secrets.CONNECTION_STRING }}
  • Last step is to set up that CONNECTION_STRING secret. This is the connection string to your Azure storage container. You can set the secret from your GitHub repository Settings tab, under Secrets.
    Click New Secret, then use the name CONNECTION_STRING and paste the access key value from your Azure storage account.

You’re all set up!
To test your publishing flow, all you need to do now is push a commit to your master branch, and see the GitHub action kick in and do its thing.
You should see your site appear in a few seconds. Sweet!

Update: recently I found out the workflow broke because of a bug in the latest version of the action. To bypass this I now fixed the version in my workflow YAML file to v1.0, which still works. It’s probably a good idea to avoid this kind of breaking changes by fixing the version of any action you use in your GitHub actions anyway. It will avoid those annoying issues where things work one day, and don’t the next.

how to host a serverless static website on azure

For my little gfpg project I wanted to put a simple static website online without having to set up and maintain a web server. I read about going serverless with a static site using S3 on AWS, but I wanted to try that on Azure instead. BLOB storage seemed the obvious alternative to S3, but it took some searching around and finding the right documentation on MSDN to get it all up and running.

If you’re on a similar quest to publish some static content to Azure BLOB storage as a serverless website, this short guide will help you along.

  1. First of all we need to create an Azure BLOB storage account for the site. The most important part is to choose a general-purpose v2 Standard storage account, for the account kind. This is the only type that supports hosting a static website. Guess who didn’t do that.
  2. Next thing is to enable static hosting of your files. This will create a $web folder in your storage account, which will be the root folder of your website. It’s that simple.
  3. Copy your files into the $web folder using the Storage explorer blade in the Storage account menu, or the Storage explorer app. You can already test your site using the Azure endpoint.
The Storage explorer is a quick and easy way to upload and manage your files in the BLOB storage account.

You can stop here if this is a personal project and you don’t need HTTPS support or a custom domain. In my case, I did want to go all the way, so here’s how to get that working as well.

  1. Get a domain name. Make it sassy ;). Make sure your domain registrar allows you to edit the CNAME records for your domain. This is pretty standard, but not all cheap web hosters allow this and you need it later on to hook up your domain to Azure.
  2. Set up an Azure CDN endpoint for your static site. I picked the Microsoft CDN option which is the most basic one, so you don’t need any accounts with a third party CDN provider.
  3. Now you can map your custom domain to your Azure CDN endpoint using a CNAME record.
  4. Create an HTTPS certificate for your site on Azure with just a few clicks. I was afraid this was going to be hard but it’s so damn easy it’s beautiful. There really is no excuse anymore to let your site just sit there on HTTP these days.
  5. Last thing to do is set up some caching rules for the CDN. We don’t want to be hitting the “slow” BLOB storage all the time and use the faster CDN instead. Depending on the option you chose for the CDN this will differ, but if you picked the Microsoft one you have to use the Standard rules engine to set your caching rules. If you picked Akamai or Verizon, you can use CDN caching rules instead.
    For a simple setup on the Microsoft CDN, go to the CDN settings Rules engine page, and set a global cache expiration rule to override and an expiration you like.
    After a few minutes you’ll see the cache header appear in your HTTP requests.
  6. Here you can also create a rule to redirect HTTP traffic to HTTPS, so people don’t accidentally hit the insecure version.

One more tip on the CDN. You can also purge the CDN cache after you pushed an update to your site to apply the changes, before your CDN cache expires. This is handy if you’ve set a rather big expiration time, because you don’t expect the site to change very often.

From the CDN account, you can purge content on a specific path, or everything at once.