publish a static website to Azure using GitHub actions

Last post I talked about setting up a serverless website on Azure using BLOB storage. What I didn’t go into is how to publish files to that site automatically. Yes, you can use the BLOB explorer to manually upload your files but seriously, who wants to do that kind of boring task if you can let computers do that for you.

Instead, what I do to publish this excellent programming guidelines website is the following:

  • I make my changes locally and test it.
  • I commit & push my changes to the master branch of my git repository.
  • A GitHub action kicks in and published the site to the Azure BLOB container.

How sweet is that? Pretty sweet, I know. How do you set this up? Well let me take you through the steps my friend, and automated Git deployment will soon be yours to enjoy as well.

  • You need to create a Git repository on GitHub.
    Now that you can create unlimited private repositories, you don’t even have to expose it to the public, which is nice.
  • Clone the repo locally, and create a source/ directory in it. This is where the source code will go, and that’s what we’ll push to the Azure BLOB container. Any other files you don’t want published go in the root, or in other folders in the root of your repository.
  • Copy your source code into the source/ folder, or create a simple index.html file for testing the publishing action.
  • Go to your repository page on the GitHub site, and click the Actions tab at the top.
  • Click New Workflow, choose “set up a workflow yourself”.
  • It will now create a YAML file for you containing your workflow code.
  • Paste the content for your YAML file listed below. Notice the “source” folder in there? That indicates what folder will be copied to Azure.
    In case you run into trouble, you can dig in to the Azure Storage Action setup yourself, but it should do the trick.
on: [push]
jobs:
  build:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps: 
    - uses: actions/checkout@v1
    - uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
      with:
        dotnet-version: '3.0.100'
    - uses: lauchacarro/Azure-Storage-Action@v1.0
      with:
        enabled-static-website: 'true'
        folder: 'source'
        index-document: 'index.html'
        error-document: '404.html' 
        connection-string: ${{ secrets.CONNECTION_STRING }}
  • Last step is to set up that CONNECTION_STRING secret. This is the connection string to your Azure storage container. You can set the secret from your GitHub repository Settings tab, under Secrets.
    Click New Secret, then use the name CONNECTION_STRING and paste the access key value from your Azure storage account.

You’re all set up!
To test your publishing flow, all you need to do now is push a commit to your master branch, and see the GitHub action kick in and do its thing.
You should see your site appear in a few seconds. Sweet!

Update: recently I found out the workflow broke because of a bug in the latest version of the action. To bypass this I now fixed the version in my workflow YAML file to v1.0, which still works. It’s probably a good idea to avoid this kind of breaking changes by fixing the version of any action you use in your GitHub actions anyway. It will avoid those annoying issues where things work one day, and don’t the next.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.