Category Archives: wordpress

how to secure your wordpress blog

carcassonne

WordPress is popular and as it goes with all kinds of popular software, it becomes a target for hackers trying to take over and use your site to send spam into the world, or just cause some other kind of mayhem.

To protect yourself from this kind of trouble, there are a few things you can do to prevent bad things from happening to your precious WordPress site.

  1. First of all, keep your WP software up-to-date. There are usually some security fixes in there and you do want to have those live on your public facing site. Hackers know what the vulnerabilities are in old WP versions and scan the internet automatically for unpatched sites. Don’t become an easy target by not having the latest version of WP installed. The latest version of WP (v3.7.1) is able to do security updates itself which is awesome. Be sure to check if your site supports this and activate it if it does.
  2. Keep your plugins up-to-date as well for the very same reason. Old plugins can offer a way in for hackers and we don’t want that to happen.
  3. Delete (old) plugins you don’t use anymore, or replace them with newer ones. JetPack has a lot on board out of the box now so you can probably ditch a few old plugins. The less plugins you have, the less possible vulnerabilities your site has.
  4. Take regular backups. In case something goes wrong, you can at least restore a version you know isn’t compromised.
  5. Harden your WP site by configuring your .htaccess file if your site runs on an Apache web server. It’s explained nicely how to do that in the link. It can prevent hackers that do get access through a bad plugin to do any more damage to the rest of your site.
  6. Use a long, hard to guess and preferably random password for your admin account. Using a different admin user is also a good idea. Brute force login attempts are made against the default “admin” user, so if that one has a long random password you’re pretty safe there. You can use something easier to remember for an alternative admin account if you want, but I recommend you to use something like KeePass to manage long & unguessable passwords anyway.

Here are some plugins that can help with these tips:

  • WordFence scans your site for possible vulnerabilities by checking your installed WP and plugin files with the ones from the official releases. It also helps with the first 2 tips by warning you by email if a plugin or WP itself needs an update. Quite handy.
  • All In One WordPress security & Firewall plugin scans your site settings for security vulnerabilities and helps you get rid of them. It also has a firewall built in.
  • WP security audit log won’t prevent anything, but it keeps track of logins, updates of plugins etc, so that if something weird happens, you can use it to figure out the “when” and “what”.
  • A backup plugin. There are plenty and you should pick one that fits your needs. I’ve used BackUpWordPress for a DB backup only, but it can also backup the files. It sends you an email with either the zipped backup or a link to download it if it’s too big to stuff in the email. Another good option is UpdraftPlus which can backup your files & DB to remote storage like Google Drive or Dropbox a.o. Your hoster might also have a full backup feature, which is usually the best option anyway as it will backup more than just your WP site.
  • BruteProtect protects (as it says) against brute force login attempts, a problem a lot of WP blogs had to deal with lately. Next to that you should of course make sure you have a complex password for your admin account.
  • Bad Behavior is mainly a tool to combat spam, but since it scans for incoming malicious requests it can also block the occasional bot looking for vulnerable sites.

For a more extensive guide to securing your WordPress site, also check out this Bloggers Guide to WordPress Security. It’s long and full of great tips and guides covering a wide rang of security practices like how to combat spam, CAPTCHA’s and setting up HTTPS.

 

guess who got hacked

Night Work

Let me tell you about that time my site got hacked.

Once upon a time I received this email from Google. Now when Google emails you, you usually pay attention, even it it’s a bot. Those guys know their stuff.
The email told me that my site was possibly hacked because it was suddenly feeding spam when the Google bot was passing by.
The reason why I got this email is because I use the free web master tools from the G btw. That way they know my site has behaved nicely over the years, and when it suddenly started spewing spam, they knew something bad was up.

The scary part is that this only happened when Googlebot was munching my pages. Not when I or any other human passed by with a browser. So in other words, I didn’t have a clue.
Because it was quite the mystery, I checked my web folder and found a few suspicious files and folders in there. Suspicious, because I never put them there.

I found a folder named “coockies“, an unknown common.php, session.php and coockies.txt file. My .htaccess file was also changed. All php files and the .htaccess had the same timestamp. I compared my complete WP installation with the original installation files to be sure no other files were modified, which turned out to be the case.

The folder seemed to contain files with file names resembling URIs of my blog posts. The content was unreadable and appeared garbage. I’m guessing it was an encoded version of the spam my site was feeding Google.

At first I thought my WP blog was hacked, but the entry point was simply the modified .htaccess file. It contained a few new rewrite rules which checked the user agent of the incoming request, and if that matched any of the major crawlers, it would redirect to the new php files, which would feed the spammy content.

Cleaning up turned out to be rather easy.
I deleted all the new files, restored my old .htaccess file (hurrah for backups) and changed my site passwords just to be sure.

The fishy thing about all this is that I’m still not sure how these files got on my system (hence the password changes). The timestamp on the files seemed to point to the moment I last ran a WP and plugin update on my site. Maybe it was pulled in with a compromised plugin, but there is no way to tell which one it could have been. Another option is a compromised FTP account, but that password was already random before I changed it so that seems unlikely. I still changed it to a random and longer one to be sure.

I also took some extra defensive measures to try to avoid this kind of hack in the future, but that’s for another post.

Photo by Thomas Heylen, cc-licensed.

get some neato wordpress plugin speed profiling stats

wp stats pie

Stats. Geeks love em and at some point my blog was acting sluggish and I was all like “OMG would it be that mobile plugin? Or the spam blocker? Or that one that makes it available for mobile?”.
Yep, you guessed it. A shear geek panic attack. So I head over to the virtual plugin store and checked if there was something out there to do that for me. Yep, having the computer do stuff for you. Another one of those things geeks love.

Enter P3, the Plugin Profiler.
After a quick profile test (takes about 5 minutes) it presents you with pretty pie and line charts telling you how long it took for your pages to load (average is less than a second, which is nice), which plugins are slowing you down and how many database queries where launched (56 on average, wow).
Interesting stuff!

To give you an idea of what that looks like without the pretty pie charts, here’s some plain old text output.

WordPress Plugin Profile Report

Report date: July 24, 2012
Theme name: Evening Red (based on Sandbox)
Pages browsed: 11
Avg. load time: 0.7966 sec
Number of plugins: 23
Plugin impact: 54.10% of load time
Avg. plugin time: 0.4310 sec
Avg. core time: 0.3161 sec
Avg. theme time: 0.0474 sec
Avg. mem usage: 19.95 MB
Avg. ticks: 4,232
Avg. db queries : 56.27
Margin of error : 0.0021 sec

Plugin list:

P3 (Plugin Performance Profiler) – 0.0054 sec – 1.26%
After The Deadline – 0.0093 sec – 2.16%
Akismet – 0.0205 sec – 4.76%
Bad Behavior – 0.0251 sec – 5.82%
Dean’s Permalinks Migration – 0.0222 sec – 5.16%
Exploit Scanner – 0.0064 sec – 1.48%
Feedburner Plugin – 0.0019 sec – 0.45%
Google Sitemap Generator – 0.0013 sec – 0.30%
Lightbox 2 – 0.0048 sec – 1.12%
Do Follow – 0.0121 sec – 2.80%
Simple Reverse Comments – 0.0020 sec – 0.47%
SoundCloud Shortcode – 0.0091 sec – 2.11%
WordPress.com Stats – 0.0147 sec – 3.42%
Subscribe To Comments – 0.0647 sec – 15.01%
Viper’s Video Quicktags – 0.0088 sec – 2.04%
Widget Category Cloud – 0.0449 sec – 10.42%
Wordpress Mobile Edition – 0.0131 sec – 3.04%
Wordpress Popular Posts – 0.0105 sec – 2.44%
wp-cache – 0.0105 sec – 2.45%
WordPress Database Backup – 0.0120 sec – 2.79%
WP Tweet Button – 0.0533 sec – 12.36%
WPtouch – 0.0225 sec – 5.23%
Yet Another Related Posts Plugin – 0.0557 sec – 12.93%