Category Archives: firefox

keeping state kicks ass

It does! What am I talking about? Anything that allows you to cut off a session you’re having, and restore it for later on, just like that. I’m talking that thing all laptops have, “hibernation mode”. The sweet part is that you don’t really have to own a laptop to enjoy the merits of hibernation. You can activate it on any XP system, with the same amount of spare drive space on the C drive as you have RAM in your machine.

I use it all the time really on my desktop PC’s. It speeds up the booting, or it gives me that impression, and I just leave apps open with stuff I’m working on. I do this at home, but mainly at work, where it’s really handy to get right back where you left off. Your cursor will even be blinking at the same spot you left it. Awesome.

Another way to keep state like this is when it’s built right into your software. Firefox does that nicely for example, by restoring all your open tabs from your last surfing session when you restart your browser. Not only is this super-handy when Firefox flakes out and dies on you (rarely, but still, it might happen), but it’s also handy when you stumble across this übercool site when you are late already for some social stuff and need to head out the door pronto. No need to save bookmarks or anything. Just exit, and go.

Keeping state. It rocks.

Photo by lecasio, cc-licensed

the right way to block evil website cookies

I posted about this back in 2004 (whooosh, where did the time go right?), but IMHO the best way to block out any evil cookies from ad agencies, tracking sites, or whoever is putting cookies on your machine, is to use a whitelist.

With a whitelist you only allow a handful of sites to put a cookie in your browser. With a blacklist you block all the evil websites that put cookies on your machine. Problem is the last one might be handier, but it’s simply impossible to know all the websites out there that suck. So by only putting the good ones in, and making sure Firefox cleans up all cookies after you close the browser, you end up with a cookie jar with only the best ones in them. Just the way we like it.

So how do you do this in Firefox 3? It’s quite easy really, and it goes like this:

  1. Open the Options window from the Tools menu.
  2. Open the Privacy tab.
  3. Check the “Accept cookies from sites” and “Accept third-party cookies” in the Cookies panel.
  4. Set the “Keep until” dropdown option to “Until I close firefox”. That way, all cookies will be erased when you close the last browser window.
  5. Click the Exceptions button. Enter the domain names of sites you trust putting cookies on your machine. Only those will be allowed from now on.

You’ll see that your whitelist will be quite limited. If you have a different and complex password for every site, using something like KeePass Password Safe makes login in to your favourite sites a lot easier, and even removed the need of adding not so frequently used sites in the whitelist at all.

This doesn’t protect you from a virus or trojan infection, but it does make it harder to track your online trail for any company that ever displayed a banner on a webpage you have been viewing.

Surf safely!

secure online banking with firefox

When it comes to doing your banking business online I don’t like taking chances. If your Myspace account gets hacked, or someone posts dirty messages on your Twitter feed that can be annoying, but if someone manages to hack into your online banking account you enter a world of pain.

Banking companies spend tons of cash securing their web sites of course, but it only takes a small mistake somewhere along the line to allow bad people to access your hard earned money. So to make sure that the black hats don’t get any favours I’ve created a super-tight Firefox profile that I only use for online banking.

So how does this “Banking Fox” work?
Well, first you create a new profile called Banking for example by starting Firefox with the -ProfileManager command line parameter.
Next you create a new Firefox shortcut somewhere with the command line parameters -p Banking (or whatever you called your profile). You might also want to add the -no-remote parameter to that. That one makes it possible to run the banking-firefox next to your trusty old surfy-firefox.
To sum it all up, you’ll probably end up with something like this:

"C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe" -p Banking -no-remote

Using that brand new shortcut you should be getting the default Firefox layout again, with the Mozilla welcome page. If you’re seeing any customisations you’ve made in your default session, like bookmarks, you’re doing it wrong! Well, you probably didn’t close your previous session (like because you where reading this magnificent post). So to use the new one, you need to close all Firefox instances first. After fully reading this post of course…

Now that we have a profile to use, it’s time to dive into the settings, and make it as secure as possible. Here’s the ones I’ve changed:

On the privacy tab:

  • Keep history for 0 days: no sniffing my browser history kthx!
  • Don’t remember stuff I enter in form.
  • Don’t remember my downloads.
  • I don’t accept cookies from any sites, except my online banking sites.
  • Always clear private data when I close Firefox (and don’t ask either).
    That’s all private data, so be sure to check all those check boxes in the settings window.

On the security tab:

  • Do not remember passwords for sites.
    That’s one I turn off for all sessions btw. It just doesn’t feel like a smart idea.

So if in any way you’re browsing a website that managed to force feed you with some nasty sort of trojan which your anti-virus software doesn’t yet know about, there’s little chance it will manage to figure out your online banking info from your Firefox profile data.
Which is nice.

Photo by Earl G, cc-licensed

blocking flash ads in firefox


Photo by bastet, cc-licensed

It happened to me twice today. At first I thought Firefox had crashed because it wasn’t responding to my mouse clicks. It turned out that one of those annoying flash ads was playing somewhere in an area out of my visual range that I was forced to click before I could use the bloody page! I’m pretty tolerant when it comes to those annoying banners and flash ads, but when they start forcing me to interact with that dumb-ass banner every time the bloody page refreshes… they are pissing me off.

So I looked around and found out about the excellent Flashblock Firefox plugin. So from now on I’ll be blocking every one of those stupid ads. How about that. I bet that’s not what you thought of with that stupid folding O2 campaign. Oh, and yeah, you can add a few exceptions to the whitelist if you want, so that your favourite flash game sites or better, stuff like Flickr aren’t affected by it.

Sweet.

six firefox shortcuts everyone should know

Firefox by Garrett LeSageIn addition to the interesting article posted on Coding Horror about the five Vista/IE browsing shortcuts anyone should know, I’m giving the same idea a shot for using the excellent Mozilla Firefox browser.

Why? Because keyboard shortcuts aren’t just good for impressing your peers with your l33t skillz as you command your software quicker than the eye can follow, they are also a huge time-save and decrease chances of getting a mouse-arm. Besides, it looks cool, but I said that already.

So here they are:

  1. Jump to the address bar with Alt+D.
  2. Jump the the search bar with Ctrl+K.
  3. Use Ctrl+Tab for browsing through your open tabs. Use Ctrl+Shift+Tab to go backwards. Whoosh! Look at em go!
  4. Ctrl+T opens up a new empty tab/page. Next you can jump to the search bar, or address bar to get to that page you wanted.
  5. Ctrl+Left Clicking A Link : this opens the link in a new tab. Very handy if you are surfing a blog (like this one) which has a lot of links to external pages (like this one).
  6. I just had to add one more. Ctrl+J opens up your Firefox downloads. I have the download window hidden by default so it doesn’t bother me when I start leeching something. A quick Ctrl+J pops this baby right up again and lets me check how long it’ll take to get those sweet files down to my system.

So there you go, ready to impress fiend and foe with your l33t shortcut skillz. Add some more in the comments if you feel I missed an important one. I’m always interested to learn a new trick.

yet another firefox beta 2 freedback post

Been checking out the latest Firefox beta 2 for about a week now and it seems to be quite robust, as usual. No crashes so far, and the spell checking feature is pretty damn cool and a great addition if you ask me. I’m using it right now for instance.

Sweet!

One detail on that one though. You have to install the English version to get that to work apparently. I chose to install the Dutch version first, feeling a little chauvinistic about my linguistic selection for a change, and I got punished for doing that right away by removing this neato feature.

Dang!

The US version does have the feature enabled, and extra dictionaries can be added by surfing to http://www.mozilla.com/thunderbird/dictionaries.html for the moment.
I’m sure this will be automated once the final release hits the virtual shelves.

A new thing is the close button on each tab, instead of the single close button on the right for the current tab sheet. I hated that in the beginning, I just kept closing the wrong window (the most right one), but I’ve pretty much gotten used to it by now, and frankly, this way it simply is better and more intuitive.
And with the new undelete-last-tab-delete function, it’s no biggy if you close the wrong window while you’re still getting used to the moved close buttons… neato!

Another nice little addition is the Google suggest search in the search box. I always liked that idea, but never used it cause I always use the embedded search in FF.

firefox 2 beta 1 screenshots

Firefox 2 beta 1 is out, and it has some nifty new features for all you manic surfer out there.
At Lifehacker they have lined up the a bunch of the shiniest new things by using pretty pictures to illustrate them (screenshots that is).

Check it out I’d say if you’re a firefox freak0r like myself.

The features I’m digging the most judging from what I can see in the article are the very welcome integrated spell checker, and the RSS feed integration.
Currently I’m completely ignoring this in v1.x, but since the v2 has a way to link directly to Google Reader, that will probably change in the near future.

Oh yeah, and the supercute pup on the right. That’s a real firefox for ya.
Ain’t it sweet?