cool geek (dev) stuff I ran into lately

... "Mr. Droopy Eyes!"

I’ve had this list around for a while and though that most people would probably have heard of this by now so I didn’t see the point in posting about it.
Until last weekend someone on twitter was happy to find out about Chocolatey. So I guess not everybody knows these little gems yet, hence this blog post!

  • Chocolatey: a Windows packages manager of sorts. A bit like apt-get on Debian. It allows you to install a bunch of Windows software and tools from the command line. It’s pretty cool and is super handy to get a (developer) box up and running in no time. It’s also handy to keep your installed package up-to-date with the “cup all” statement. Sweet.
    There’s lot’s of good stuff in the gallery already, so you’ll probably find your favorite tool in there. If not, you can add it yourself because it’s built on the NuGet package manager system, or browse what’s available and find some new gems you didn’t know about yet.
  • I haven’t really used Boxstarter myself yet, but if you’re planning on using Chocolatey for some serious VM Windows installer magic, it might come in handy. It builds on top of Chocolatey and allows 100% uninterrupted Windows installs. Thought it was worth mentioning.
  • ScriptCS: one of Glenn Block & co little open source coding adventures. He thought it would be cool to use C# and the .NET framework to run scripts on Windows using the Roslyn compiler API. No need for Visual Studio, project files, compilers or anything like that. Just the scriptcs executable and a text file with your C# script code. Much like Node.js or Python for example. You know, scripting languages.
    Turns out this idea took off like a rocket in the community and has all sorts of cool features by now, like Nuget integration and script packs for reusability. It’s awesome.
  • dotnetfiddle.net : It’s jsfiddle for C# code. It’s a web site where you can type some C# code in a console application, run it and see your output instantly. Great of small bits of test code. It even has intellisense support so it’s easier if to use than LinqPad for this kind of tests apps if you don’t know all the statements by heart.
  • devdocs.io: all web dev docs in one place and easily searchable. Contains docs for thing like the HTML5 spec, JS, HTTP, HTML DOM and the most popular frameworks like Ember, Backbone, Angular, Knockout and Underscore. Also language like Python, Node, Ruby etc. In short, useful stuff for any web developer working with a modern stack.

Image by James Vaughan, cc-licensed.

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