warmup your site or wordpress blog with a single command line statement

mother

GNU Wget is a powerful tool when it comes to downloading files from the web or mirroring sites. It’s command line features can be daunting and not very obvious. With some experimentation, reading the (f..) manual and some Googling you can get it to do some pretty neat tricks for you.
All of that is from the command line too, which is great if you want to schedule this kind of magic or use it in a script.

For example, you might want to warm-up your site or WordPress blog so your homepage and all posts linked from it are present in your cache when a visitor arrives. I’m assuming you are using a caching on your site otherwise this is pretty pointless. For WordPress you can use a caching plugin like W3 Total Cache for example.

With Wget, it goes like this:

wget.exe http://n3wjack.net --spider --no-directories --level=1 --recursive 
         --accept-regex=n3wjack.net/20[1..9].*

The command line parameters (in order) mean something like:

  1. Crawl n3wjack.net.
  2. Crawl it like a spider (follow the links).
  3. Don’t create directories for downloads.
  4. Crawl 1 level deep (so anything linked on the homepage is OK, but don’t go deeper).
  5. Do this recursively (so it actually goes 1 level deep).
  6. Follow only links that start with "/201..." to "/209..." (it’s a regular expression).
    This one is a trick to have it only follow links to blog-posts because my URL scheme begins with the year of the post (2015, 2016, …). It’s good until 2099, which should do the trick I guess. :)
    This way I’m also avoiding it loading all tag, category or page links.

If your site has a different URL scheme you’ll have to change the accept regex pattern to fit your scheme.

You can download Wget from the GNU site. It’s Open Source and is available for Windows, Mac and various Unix systems.
For Chocolatey users, there is a wget package available to install it on your system.

verifying an md5 file hash with just powershell

Tools
You see this possibility for a lot of software downloads but if you’re like me you hardly ever end up doing it: verifying an install file’s MD5 or SHA-something hash.
For Open Source software this is however recommended if you aren’t downloaded from the official mirror (and even then) and certainly if it’s anything related to security (like Keepass for example).

But to verify that MD5 hash you probably need to install yet another piece of software you’re hardly going to need, so you end up not bothering at all.

Hold on a second.

If you have a recent Windows system with PowerShell installed, you probably have all you need to verify that MD5 hash.

Try this in the PowerShell command prompt:

Get-FileHash .\KeePass-2.30-Setup.exe -Algorithm md5

It should print out something like this:

Algorithm       Hash
---------       ----
MD5             CD430EB0F108BB192D2155C68EB7BB48

Which happens to be exactly the MD5 hash code listed on the site for that version of the Keepass installer. Yay!
Without that -Algorithm parameter it prints out the SHA-256 hash by default, but that’s longer and harder to compare visually even though it’s more precise.

That was easy and required no additional software.
Pretty damn sweet.

Photo by Julien Dumont, cc-licensed.

how to move an unreachable window on windows 7, 8 or 10

arrowsOn the “good” old XP this required some trickery and knowledge of window specific shortcuts, but on more recent version of Windows this has become really easy to do.

So if you run into a situation where an application’s window is outside your visible area, because you disconnected a second screen for example and the app doesn’t automatically snap to the only screen left, simply do this:

  • Keep the Windows key pressed and hit the cursor key left or right.

Your window will simply snap back to your current screen and all is well.
Using it with the up & down arrow will maximize or minimize the active window. Always handy to know those shortcuts if you have both hands on the keyboard anyway.

Photo by Dean Hochman, cc-licensed.

mstsc.exe crashes on Windows 8 (and how to fix it)

Physical View of the Network

When using MSTSC (Microsoft Terminal Server Client aka RDP or Remote Desktop on Windows) to dial into a local HyperV virtual machine on my laptop it often happened that MSTSC crashed on me. When reconnecting afterwards, the VM was running just fine. So it seemed to be an issue on my local machine and not the VM. I assumed it had something to do with HyperV and RDP and didn’t look into it any further (I didn’t need it that much after all).

The exception code I got in my Event Viewer for the crash was 0xc0000005 on ntdll.dll.

But then I kept having this problem so often when connecting to a physical machine in the network it annoyed me enough to Google for a possible solution.
One post pointed me in the right direction (which I can’t find anymore, sorry about that), being that it had something to do with sharing of local resources. In my case I recently activated the option to transfer sound between the remote and my local machine so I could use Skype & Linq.

Turns out that was indeed the culprit. Whenever my remote machine made a sound, my RDP client crashed. Bummer!
Turning off sound transferring to my host machine made the crashes go away. Sweet!

So if you also run into this, try turning off some of those local resources.

It still sucks if you need sound of course, but in my case, I can live with the silence.

Photo by Robin Gist, cc-licensed.

music of 2015

the audience is shaking ( #CC )Here’s some music I liked in 2015 that I either talked about before or forgot to mention so far. I get stuff emailed to me, listen to it and then forget to write about it sometimes. Dang.

So I’ll mix those in here so they get their mention at last.

Drum’n’bass

Ah, the good old dnb. If you haven’t already checked out the weekly Noisia Radio podcasts on Soundcloud it’s about time you did. You’ll hear new tracks, old ones and get a lot of inspiration on what tracks you can spend that New Years money on.

Another place to check for some fresh, dark drum’n’bass is Syk2ne’s Bandcamp or Soundcloud page. Lot’s of wicked EP’s right there and not strictly dnb either. It easily crosses over into the next category…

Breakcore

Here we have Ruby my Dear of course with his latest Balloon album. Then there’s Venetian Snares, as always, who not only released Your Face this year but also put up the awesome Thank Your For Your Consideration after fans stepped up when Snares hit a rough patch and could use some extra cash. Sissy Growl and Burgershot are my favorite tracks of 2015 for sure.

Mo breackore? Aww yiss. How about YabaiKore! from the Japanese breakcore collective the Ragga Terror Front. Some really wicked sick stuff in there. Totally worth a listen.

Hardcore techno

Here I have 2 podcasts/radio shows to point out, full of all the hardcore goodness you’d want. First there’s the PRSPCT Recordings radio episodes on Soundcloud. Awesome guests, “great” interviews and quite some nonsense in there. And smashing kicks of course.
We can’t leave without mentioning The Outside Agency podcasts as well. Not quite as frequent but that just makes them all the better.

Hope you find your type of beats and bass in here.
Enjoy the holidays, have a happy NY and see you back in 2016!

Photo by Martin Fisch, cc-licensed.

new ruby my dear album balloon

Ruby My Dear "Balloon" album coverWriting a music review is both hard and kinda pointless. It’s music after all and as long as you don’t listen to it you can read all the text you want but you still won’t know what the hell it sounds like.
So I won’t be copying the info from the press release the lads at Kaometry records where so kind to send me for the latest Ruby My Dear release “Balloon“.

Instead I can say that it’s pretty damn solid breakcore album true to the style Ruby My Dear has developed over the years.
If you like his earlier work like the awesome Ginko EP or his earlier Doc Colibri exploits, you’ll love this one too. If his music is new to you but you like things from electronica artists like Aphex Twin, Venetian Snares or even a slice of Squarepusher, you’ll probably find this a treat as well.

So go check out the previews on the Kaometry records Soundcloud page. It’s coming out this Monday the 14th of December, so hit your record store and get that vinyl record or digital album full of breakcore goodness!

disabling Dell software without uninstalling

Yes, a cat. Cause it's the internet after all.

You know how it goes. You get this new and shiny computer from big computer company X and with it you don’t only get your OEM licensed Windows OS but also some “super handy” tools X happened to install just for you.

Dell is no different so mine come with Dell Data Vault, Dell SupportAssist and Dell Update Service. All of this is (of course) for your own benefit to update your machine to the latest drivers and blah blah blah, even though anything crucial is sent through Windows update anyway.

The downside is that these things are constantly running and using up your precious CPU and memory, while you’ll probably never need them. Ever. Oh, and they also come with some security vulnerabilities apparently, which is always a good reason to kick their butt.

I don’t know what Dell Data Vault even does and don’t care to either (it’s backup software probably). To make things worse it even causes my system to lag sometimes which I notice as my audio glitches up when that happens. I don’t always listen to breakcore you know, so I do noticed that sometimes.

I also noticed that uninstalling Dell Data Service is pointless as (I think) the Dell UpdateService will just reinstall it. Which sucks.

So I see two options.

  1. Uninstalling all Dell related software. This is kinda drastic and you might want that stuff if you need support after all.
  2. Disable the software and prevent it from starting up altogether.

So how do you stop those services from starting up automatically? Here’s how:

  1. On you desktop, press WindowsKey-R, this brings up the Run prompt.
  2. Type services.msc and hit enter. This brings up the list of services installed on your machine.
  3. Look for the Dell ones in the list.
  4. Open them, one by one, and in the General tab select the startup type “Disabled”.
  5. Hit “OK” to save.

How to disable a service from auto-starting.Note that in the screenshot I’m disabling a completely innocent service per demonstration as I don’t have a Dell machine handy with an English version of Windows on it.

From now on those pesky services won’t be wasting your resources anymore, untill the day you might need them again. All you have to do then is go back into the services console and switch the startup type back to Automatic and save.
Then right-click the services in the list and choose “Start”, or simply reboot the machine.

But we’re not quite there yet. There’s still the case of PCDoctor and the SupportAssist client. Those sneaky startups are hidden in the scheduled tasks. You can disable them using the Task Scheduler like this:

  1. Press WinKey-R and type Taskschd.msc, press enter.
  2. In the list of scheduled tasks in the root node you’ll see a “Dell SupportAssistAgent AutoUpdate” or something similar.
  3. Right click the task and choose “Disable”.
  4. Repeat for any other Dell tasks in there.

They don’t all have “Dell” in their name, but if you check the Action tab below the path to the executable will give them away (like in the screenshot). In my case I had some additional PCD (PC Doctor) tasks and one SystemToolsDailyTest task to disable.

Another good tool to disable scheduled tasks if from the CCleaner tools menu, or by using the SysInternals Autoruns tool.The name of the task doesn't tell, but the path to the executable does indicate it's a piece of Dell software.

This worked for me, but as is mostly the case with things you find on the internet… use this info wisely and at your own risk. ;)

Photo by Massimo Regonati, cc-licensed.